The Magnificent Aschenbachs

Lately, many people have been asking me if I’m writing a sequel to The Gym Show.  While I think a sequel would be an excellent complement to what will always be (maybe) my favorite novel, I had already begun my second novel before The Gym Show became so popular.  So will I write a sequel?  Yes.  But first, my compulsive personality insists that I finish my second novel, The Magnificent Aschenbachs.

Would you like a peek?  Thought so.  Here is an excerpt from The Magnificent Aschenbachs.

   After that rather strange greeting, January’s initial reaction to Richard’s home was one of awe, but she fought the urge to appear wide-eyed and naïve, and tried desperately to appear as if it were an everyday thing to walk into a spectacularly furnished and appointed mansion like the main character in Daphne Du Maurier’s Rebecca.  And, like the nameless protagonist, January felt childishly out-of-place and wished she had worn something a little less showy (Gold lame, January, really?) and a little more conservative.

    Sadly, she didn’t have clothes in her wardrobe to match the splendor of the home, and she certainly was not dressed in the same manner as Richard’s mother, the formidable looking Angelika.  What did Angelika say to Richard when he had introduced her?  She knew it was German by the accent, but she had no idea what she said.  Richard had seemed rather taken aback, and even now, he was still somewhat quiet as if Angelika’s words had generated in him some meaningful response that he was still trying to piece together in his perplexed state.  January felt as if he was going through the motions of shepherding her through the house without really considering her at all.  This was turning out to be one of the most awkward and uncomfortable experiences she had ever remembered and wondered if all first dates were this excruciating.

The story is set in the mid-80’s in Indianapolis, and if you’re a Booth Tarkington fan, you might recognize that the title is a play off his Pulitzer Prize winning novel, The Magnificent Ambersons.  Think of my interpretation, though, as another slice of life in Indianapolis, told mainly through the eyes of a young inner-city teacher who faces daunting challenges both in her professional and her personal life.

It’s going to be spectacular, I promise!  Estimated time of completion?  I’ll keep you posted.

Thinking Outside the Book

The Gym Show

I had a wonderful conversation with Mary LoVerde yesterday.  Mary is quasi-related to me by marriage, and I had the privilege of meeting her at my nephew Lynn’s wedding.  Remember?  The wedding I never made it to?  Luckily for me, though I never made it to the wedding, I was able to meet Mary at the reception.

After our chat yesterday, I’m so glad I didn’t get lost on the way there.

I wanted to ask Mary’s advice about the publishing world.  Having published four bestselling books, who better to ask?  My question was simple:  How do I get a mainstream publishing company to read and review my book The Gym Show for publication?  The underlying question:  How do I make The Gym Show a bestseller?

Her answer was surprising.  She asked me why I wanted a publishing company to take over the sale and distribution of my intellectual property.  I told her that I thought this was the only way to get millions and millions (yes, I think big) of people to read my book.  I was wrong.  Apparently, according to Mary, the publishing world is changing, and more often than not, writers are opting to publish their own work under their own terms.  The writers, not the publishing company, the literary agents, nor the publicists, are the ones in charge of their own destiny.

So I am putting myself in charge of my destiny.  I’ve written a terrific book–I think it’s terrific, and a whole lot of others who have read it agree with me.  Over and over I hear, “I couldn’t put it down.”  That, to me, is the mark of a good story.

Sure, there are naysayers out there, some who have already made their opinions known.  But you know what? Unless it’s constructive criticism, I don’t give a fiddler’s fart about what they say because I’ve never been more sure of anything in my life.

The Gym Show is a great story, it’s my story, and I’m sticking to it.

Am I going to write another novel?  Already in the works, my friends.  Am I going to write a sequel to The Gym Show?  I don’t know …tell me what you think.